McSweeney- McSweeney Perspectives

June 2014

Who’s the Real Expert...?



 

Ian Duff, Director of Economic Development Consulting
www.mcsweeney.ca
Email: Ian@mcsweeney.ca
Twitter: @IanDuff583

Below, Ian explores how the combination of the Economic Developer's local insight and the experience of a consultant can lead to a more successful project.

 

As an Economic Development Consultant I have had the opportunity to see many different communities across Canada and interact with some really great people. That being said, there is one comment I often hear that is somewhat misleading – "Well you must know that, you are the expert…”

Yes, in many respects I am an expert in several areas related to Economic and Community Development and I always do my best to ensure the communities I work with get the best guidance and advice. Yet, often the "you are the expert” comment is related to a very specific community issue or local historical fact. The truth is that while we consultants are knowledgeable in this field: we are not the experts on your community, you are!
 
Though it may sound strange for a consultant to tell their clients that they are the experts, in reality nobody knows the community better. Often times, when beginning a new project there is a misconception that consultants have the silver bullet solution or that they have access to a magical black box of answers. In truth, the most successful projects heavily involve the client (often Economic Development Officer) and consultant working closely together with the community’s economic stakeholders. The consultant can provide a fresh set of eyes and a wealth of knowledge and experience, particularly in process, while the client can provide local knowledge, connections and facilitate strong two-way communication. Neither is effective on its own and both are required for a truly successful project. 
 
 

Taking this approach one step further, it is critical that the EDO (or the local resource) be the face of the majority of economic and community development projects – especially strategies. The community needs to see the EDO as the leader of the project, as the expert and the one who will be responsible for coordinating the implementation of any actions that arise. The consultant is active behind the scenes helping to facilitate the relationship between the community and Economic Development office. The more engaged the EDO is in the project and in the community, the more impressive the results, and hopefully, the more successful in implementation.

In my own experience, I have worked with various clients who have been engaged in the community and project at differing levels. For me, there is nothing more rewarding than working with a client who is engaged both in their community and in their projects. Consultants have a definite role to play through the process as a guide and as a resource but the client (EDO) should never underestimate the value of their contribution to the success of a project. 

So next time the question "Who is the Real Expert?” is asked, remember you are the true expert when it comes to matters affecting your local economy, local businesses and your local community – I am just here to facilitate success. 


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Your Brand is an Iceberg

Municipal leaders and economic development professionals recognize the importance of having an effective brand for their community. They also recognize that branding is more than having an attractive visual identifier or logo.

An interesting way of looking at branding is as if it was an iceberg. The part you see – the 10% – is the logo, the marketing materials, the website, etc. This is where promises are made, and where the community usually makes its first impression. It could be referred to as its ‘Brand Expression’.

But the 90% under the water is even more significant. How the community deals with its stakeholders; how it responds to requests; the programs and incentives it offers. What kind of experience do residents and visitors – and investors – have when they deal with the municipality? We can call this the ‘Brand Experience’.

Ideally, the top and bottom match! A brand is not sustainable if there are gaps between promise and performance.
 
 
The welcoming messages in the literature should reflect a welcoming community in reality. The promises made in the promotional campaign will come to life when a visitor experiences the community for the first time. The claims of a catchy tagline are supported by testimonials from real people.

Municipal branding is a dynamic, 360-degree, multi-level, corporation-wide, holistic marketing process that starts from within, and spreads outward to the target audience. 

The brand should reflect the marketing plan. Done well it serves to attract interest, build trust, provide solid value and generate lasting relationships.

 
Tom Graham – Principal + Creative Director of TD Graham + Associates Marketing Communications. www.tdgraham.com
Contact: tdgraham@tdgraham.com.

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